Tag Archives: feedback

REFLECTION ON GIVING AND RECIEVEING FEEDBACK #2

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The experience of giving and receiving feedback has been somewhat different the second time around for two reasons. Firstly we are all at different stages of completion with Kym having finished her posts and Heidee still working through the data analysis stage. Secondly, now that we have all received formal feedback from our lecturer we have a greater understanding of where our strengths and weaknesses are and are more confident to ask our group members for feedback on specific areas.

As with Blog Stage 1, giving and receiving feedback from my peers whilst working on this subject was a valuable way to feel less disconnected. I was able to take a step back from my own work and focus on what others were doing. This allowed me to confirm that I was on the right track and the opportunity to review other group member’s blogs was a great experience in becoming more aware of shortcomings in my own writing and presentation of ideas. I was particularly impressed with Heidee’s writing style as she seemed to be writing with an awareness of an audience wider than just that of other students doing this subject. Acronyms she used were explained, and in her posts prior knowledge was not assumed. After reading her blog I tried to ‘clean up’ my blog posts so that if someone read one in isolation they would not need to read the whole blog to know what I was talking about. I also included references at the end of each post for the same reason.

Kym had been disappointed with her mark from blog stage 1 and with this in mind I tried to give her very direct feedback if I thought she was missing something important from her posts. I still phrased this in a positive way (which is an ingrained teacher thing that is difficult not to do) but would directly ask: What about this? Have you considered this? There were some posts that I couldn’t find and she was going to check her blog to make sure they were visible and clearly labelled. Kym’s feedback to me usually ended with a question or point that would give me cause for reflection and begin a conversational thread which was great as I enjoy the interactive aspect of a blog. My main form of feedback to Kym and Heidee this time was in the form of editing their work. As their writing was of a high standard I felt like I had little to contribute in terms of ideas so I proofed their work to pick up on typos, spelling and grammatical errors. This was relatively quick and easy for me to do being an English teacher and both of them were appreciative of my efforts.

The formal feedback I received from Mandy on my video pointed out that more information on recommendations would be valuable and I was able to ensure that I gave that extra consideration when writing up that post in Blog Stage 2. The opportunity to review other students work and receive feedback on mine was particularly valuable as it gave opportunity for reflection which is essential for me to construct knowledge and meaning and improve my writing and presentation skills.

FEEDBACK REFLECTION #1

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As an external student it is not difficult to feel somewhat detached from University life. As you sit working away on your computer at home you become cocooned in your own thoughts and experiences. Giving and receiving feedback from my peers whilst working on this subject was a valuable way to feel less disconnected. I was able to take a step back from my own work and focus on what others were doing. This allowed me to confirm that I was on the right track and the opportunity to review other group member’s blogs was a great experience in becoming more aware of shortcomings in my own writing and presentation of ideas. The informal feedback process that I engaged in with my group members , emailing each other and discussing concerns and questions, was particularly useful to become aware that I was not the only one experiencing some of the affective feelings discussed by Kuhlthau et al. in the Information Search Process (1997, p.19). During the Exploration stage we were all experiencing feelings of confusion, frustration and doubt and the realisation that my feelings were not unique made me feel less overwhelmed by them.

As previously discussed in my analysis of inquiry models, my experiences mostly paralleled The Alberta Inquiry Model (Alberta. 2004, ch.2, p.10). Reviewing the process is at the core of this model and is essential at every step. The opportunity to review other students work and receive feedback on mine particularly fits in with the ‘Information Processing and Information Sharing’ section of this model. In the Information Sharing stage students present the research product in a way that is meaningful for a particular audience. There is also opportunity for the students to consider the role of the audience members in enhancing the sharing experience (Oberg, 1999, Para. 14.).This occurred when I published my blog posts and received feedback, from there I was again able to review and consider whether changes were needed before the final findings were presented.

REFERENCES

Alberta.(2004). Alberta Learning. Learning and Teaching Resources Branch.

Focus on inquiry: a teacher’s guide to implementing inquiry-based learning.

Focus on Inquiry Chapter 2 p. 9 Alberta Learning, Alberta, Canada 2004 Retrieved September 8, 2012 from http://education.alberta.ca/media/313361/focusoninquiry.pdf

Kuhlthau, C., Maniotes, L. And Caspari, A. (2007) Guided Inquiry: learning in the 21st century     school. Westport: Greenwood. Retrieved September 8 from     http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/~kuhlthau/index.html

Oberg, D. (1999). Teaching the research process – for discovery and personal growth.

In 65th International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions Council and General Conference Bangkok, Thailand, August 20 – August 28, 1999 Retrieved September 8, 2012 from
http://archive.ifla.org/IV/ifla65/papers/078-119e.htm